The Voices of Martyrs – A Review Round Up

Do reviews help when you’re trying to decide whether to purchase a book? Let’s see what you think after these:

THE VOICES OF MARTYRS-Cover1

Publishers Weekly
The lush, descriptive prose tantalizes all the senses, drawing the reader into a rich world spanning both miles and centuries. Hints of magic in both the past and present, as well as the science fiction elements of the future stories, make this an exciting exploration of genre as well as culture.
[read the full review]

File 770
This isn’t a collection to be rushed through; it’s best savored more slowly and thoughtfully. But read it you definitely should. Highly recommended.
[read the full review]

Reading and Gaming for Justice
I found myself reflecting on these stories following the weeks I finished the final story. Each story is dense and brings its own message and feeling. Each story made me stop and think. This is not a a short story collection to read in one sitting but one to string out and enjoy each individual story, each individual voice.
[read the full review]

Crittermom (GoodReads)
The Voices of Martyrs is an incredible, eloquently written anthology and I highly recommend it. 5 / 5
[read the full review]

Foreword Reviews
Most refreshing is that nowhere in The Voices of Martyrs does Broaddus present a stereotype or predictable trope; there’s a clear sense that he’s having fun writing what he wants to, and that readers are just hitching a ride on the roller-coaster of his imagination until the ride stops, or they fall off.
[read the full review here]

No*Con?

TL;DR – The weekend of May 6-7th, the Broaddus family would love to host folks to just hang out at our house all weekend. If writerly folks wanted to stay at a nearby hotel* and if they wanted to drop by the house, they would be welcome. No pressure. No planning. No*Con.**

Many people have asked whether or not I’d bring back Mo*Con. The reality was that the planning (and stress) of Mo*Con ate up the first quarter of my year. I increasingly wasn’t able to attend cons nor get much writing done. Despite whatever Mandela effect we may be experiencing, 2016 was actually the only year we’ve not done Mo*Con. I was able to attend a few more cons, including Confusion a couple weeks ago. Last year, I wrote over a half dozen stories by June. So, short answer, no.

BUT … I do miss folks.

At a few cons, several folks (especially looking at you Anton Cancre and Sarah Hans) kept whispering in my ear like a devil and angel on each shoulder. They posed a simple hypothetical: would I be willin to just open up my home and be willing to have folks come by and hang out. The same kind of conversations could happen, since, frankly, “the best part of Mo*Con was hanging out in your garage.”***

So the first weekend in May, the 6-7th (coincidentally when we usually would host Mo*Con), the Broaddus family will be home, braced and ready for company. We’ll enjoy food, drinks, and conversation. Meals we’ll do by a combination of pitch in and on site cooking (if folks want to paypal-ing me in advance, we can cater a meal or two).

One more time, the weekend of May 6-7th, the Broaddus family would love to host folks just hanging out at our house all weekend. If writerly folks wanted to stay at a nearby hotel and if they wanted to drop by the house, they would be welcome. No pressure. No planning. No*Con.

Drop me a line if you have any questions (or to let us know that you’re coming).

*I don’t care if folks decide they want to just camp out in our backyard. However, if you wanted to stay at this hotel, we’ve secured discounted rates:

Wingate by Wyndham Northwest
6240 Intech Commons Dr.
Indianapolis, IN 46278
P: 317/275-7000 C: 317/752-2312
web: www.wingateindianapolis.com
DISCOUNT CODE: CGMWC4

**Lee Harris was the first to call it that. Faux*Con was a close second.
***When the history of my contribution to the genre is written, let it be about my garage.

Apex Magazine #95 – Guest Edited by Maurice Broaddus (Sneak Peek)

 

apex 95 cover

Stories by Walter Mosley, Sheree Renée Thomas, Chesya Burke, and Kendra Fortmeyer.

Poems by Linda D Addison and Lawana Holland-Moore.

Essay by Tanya DePass. Interview by Andrea Johnson.

Cover art by Angelique Shelley.

Claim the Throne Photo

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I haven’t made a big deal out of this, but I wanted to at least share this pic. For context, I’m slated to receive a community award at the Claim the Throne event. “Claim the Throne is aimed at recognizing and celebrating the lives and achievements of men who have and are playing pivotal roles in the building and uplifting of the people and communities that we live in…With this knowledge, we will celebrate the hard work and dedication that our men have shown towards family, community, arts, education and more.

(For more information, go to their EventBrite page)

With that in mind, I was invited to be a part of their photo shoot. Here is the result (Chandra Lynch of ANKH Photography):

Claim the Throne

You can find my actual author pics on my Press Kit page, but I may have to add this one … just cause.

Dive into Worldbuilding – Maurice Broaddus and The Voices of Martyrs

Q & A with Maurice Broaddus

buffalo-soldier-finalWhile Tor.com has a very full and impressive lineup of novellas coming out in the near future the one that stood out the most to me was Buffalo Soldier by Maurice Broaddus.  A secret agent escorting a mysterious young boy through a North America completely different from our own?  What is not to want?  After reading the tale, and enjoying it very much, I asked if the author would be willing to answer a few questions.  Thankfully he agreed!  But first, some information on the upcoming tale!

Having stumbled onto a plot within his homeland of Jamaica, former espionage agent, Desmond Coke, finds himself caught between warring religious and political factions, all vying for control of a mysterious boy named Lij Tafari.

Wanting the boy to have a chance to live a free life, Desmond assumes responsibility for him and they flee. But a dogged enemy agent remains ever on their heels, desperate to obtain the secrets held within Lij for her employer alone.

Assassins, intrigue, and steammen stand between Desmond and Lij as they search for a place to call home in a North America that could have been.

Publication Date: April 25 - Available for pre-order NOW

First of all, thank you so much for agreeing to a Q & A.  I loved Buffalo Soldier and have a major fascination with GOOD alternative history and just had to ask a few questions.

[Continued over on BookNest]

The One Book That Taught Me How to Explore Faith in My Writing

Desperation-UK-crop

 

Issues of faith matter a lot to me and I’m always fascinated by how they are explored in fiction. It’s something that’s been a theme in some of my writing, but when I was starting out, it was something I shied away from. It took Stephen King’s Desperation to show me the light.

[continued on the Tor.com site]

 

 

 

 

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN SPECULATIVE FICTION – A READING PRIMER

KI - black spec fic I recently spoke at the Kheprw Institute on the history of Black Spec Fic. This is the reading list I provided as a starting point:

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN SPECULATIVE FICTION – A READING PRIMER

Martin Delany
Blake, or the Huts of America (1859)

Charles W. Chesnutt
The Conjure Woman (1899)

Frances Harper
Iola Leroy (1892)

Sutton Griggs
Imperium in Imperio (1899)

Pauline Hopkins
Of One Blood (1902)

Edward A. Johnson
Light Ahead for the Negro (1904)

W. E. B. Du Bois
“The Comet” (1920)
“Jesus Christ in Texas” (1920)

Zora Neale Hurston
Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937)
Mules and Men (1935)
Tell My Horse (1938)

George Schuyler
Black No More (1931)

Henry Dumas
Echo Tree

Amos Tutuola
The Palm Wine Drinkard (1952)
My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (1954)

Samuel R. Delany
The Jewels of Aptor (1962)
Dhalgren (1975)
“Racism and Science Fiction”

Virginia Hamilton (1934-2002)
Zeely (1967)
The Magical Adventures of Pretty Pearl (1986)
The Justice Trilogy (2012)

Ishmael Reed
Mumbo Jumbo (1972)

Toni Morrison
Song of Solomon (1977)
Beloved (1987)

Octavia E. Butler
Kindred (1979)
“Bloodchild” (1984)
Parable of the Sower (1993)
Fledgling (2005)

Charles Saunders
Imaro (1981)

Gloria Naylor
Mama Day (1988)

Charles R. Johnson
Middle Passage (1990)

Jewelle Gomez
The Gilda Stories (1991)

Tananarive Due
My Soul to Keep (1997)
The Good House (2003)
Ghost Summer (2015)

Christopher Priest (Jim Owsley)
Black Panther v.3 (1998- 2003)

Nalo Hopkinson
Brown Girl in the Ring (1998)
Midnight Robber (2000)

Sandra Jackson-Opoku
The River Where Blood Is Born (1998)

Victor LaValle
Slapboxing with Jesus (1999)
Big Machine (2009)
The Ballad of Black Tom (2016)

Colson Whitehead
The Intuitionist (1999)
Zone One (2011)
The Underground Railroad (2016)

Sheree Renée Thomas
Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora (2000)
Dark Matter: Reading the Bones (2004)

Walter Mosley
Futureland: Nine stories of an imminent future (2001)

Linda D. Addison
Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Grey Ashes (2001)
Being Full of Light, Insubstantial (2007)
How to Recognize a Demon has Become your Friend (2011)

Steven Barnes
Lion’s Blood (2002)
Zulu Heart (2003)

L.A. Banks
The Vampire Huntress Legend series (2003-2010)
Crimson Moon series (2008- 2010)

Minister Faust
Coyote Kings of the Space- Age Bachelor Pad (2004)
From the Notebooks of Dr. Brain (2007)

Brandon Massey
Dark Dreams (2004)
Dark Corner (2004)

Andrea Hairston
Mindscape (2006)
Redwood and Wildfire (2011)

Nisi Shawl
Filter House (2008)
Stories for Chip (w/ Bill Campbell 2015)

Wrath James White
The Resurrectionist (2009)

Nnedi Okorafor
Who Fears Death (2010)
Akata Witch (2011)
Binti (2016)

Maurice Broaddus
“Pimp My Airship” (2009)
King Maker (2010)
The Voices of Martyrs (2017)

Helen Oyeyemia
White is for Witching (2010)

N.K. Jemisin
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (2010)
The Fifth Season (2015)

Chesya Burke
Let’s Play White (2011)

Mat Johnson
Pym (2011)

Milton Davis
Changa’s Safari (2011)

Balogun Ojetade
Moses: The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman (2012)

Tobias Buckell
Arctic Rising (2012)
Hurricane Fever (2014)

Sofia Samatar
A Stranger in Olondria (2013)

Bill Campbell
Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond (2013)
Stories for Chip (w/ Nisi Shawl 2015)

Alaya Dawn Johnson
The Summer Prince (2013)
Love Is the Drug (2015)
“A Guide to the Fruits of Hawai’i” (2015)

Jenn Brissett
Elysium (2014)

Tade Thompson
Making Wolf (2015)

Kai Ashante Wilson
“The Devil in America” (2015)
The Sorcerer of the Wildeeps (2015)
A Taste of Honey (2016)

Walidah Imarisha and adrienne maree brown
Octavia’s Brood (2015)

Marlon James
The Dark Star trilogy (2017)

 

 

Shout Outs
John F. Allen
Paula D. Ashe
Michael Boatman
K. Tempest Bradford
Crystal Connor
Errick Dunnally
Andre Duza
Robert Fleming
Craig Laurance Gidney
LR Giles
Seressia Glass
Lawanna Holland-Moore
Valjeanne Jeffers
Jemiah Jefferson
Rhonda Jackson Joseph
John Edward Lawson
Kai Leakes
Alicia McCalla
Carl Hancock Rux
J. Malcolm Stewart
Geoffrey Thorne
K. Ceres Wright
Ibo Zoboi

 

Check out:

A Crash Course in the History of Black Science Fiction

Science Fiction by African Writers

My Favorite Bit: Maurice Broaddus talks about THE VOICES OF MARTYRS

THE VOICES OF MARTYRS-Cover1

My collection, The Voices of Martyrs, represents nearly a ten year span of my writing career. I wanted to wait until I had enough stories published before I began to choose stories for a collection. I noticed that my stories could be very easily grouped into tales from the Past, tales from the Present, and tales from the Future. It opens with a story set in ancient Africa and closes with one set on a colony in the far reaches of space. It’s a little known fact that for a long time my working title for this collection was “Black to the Future.”

But my absolute favorite bit is … [continue reading on Mary Robinette Kowal’s site]

Ten Authors on the ‘Hard’ vs. ‘Soft’ Science Fiction Debate

martian-hardSF

In the wake of big-screen success stories like The Martian and Star Wars: The Force Awakens, debates about whether one movie or another is scientific enough have been cropping up in various corners of the internet. Is a deeper, harder line being drawn in the sand about “hard” science fiction than usual? Or are we discovering that perhaps there’s a whole lot more sand available with regards to how imaginative and future-looking fiction can develop, and even entertaining the possibility that these developments could become blueprints for future-fact?

I asked ten science fiction authors [NOTE FROM MAURICE: SPOILERS ... I'M ONE OF THE TEN!] about their definitions of “hard” and “soft” science fiction, and how they see science fiction (hard, soft, and otherwise) in today’s terms. They returned with ten fascinating—and not surprisingly, entirely different—answers.

[Head over to Ten Authors on the ‘Hard’ vs. ‘Soft’ Science Fiction Debate]

Afronauts Podcast

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I was a guest over on the Afronauts podcast. I should warn you: 1) I was supposed to be there to promote my collection, The Voices of Martyrs, and 2) I suck at promotion. My 30 minute appearance (beginning at the 1:07 mark) went way off the rails as we went down the rabbit hole of comic books and movies. It was a great convo and I look forward to being back on their show!

[Head over to the Afronauts podcast]