“Planet Gotham”

Writer:  Grant Morrison

Artist:  David Finch

Publisher:  DC Comics

Price:  $4.99

Grant Morrison (Arkham Asylum, JLA, X-Men) makes a major shift in the status quo of the Batman mythos  after he has Bruce Wayne publicly announce that he has been funding the Batman’s war on crime.  While this may seem reminiscent of Tony Stark’s revelation of being Iron Man, this actually seems to be the plan of Batman hinted at in Mark Waid’s classic mini-series, Kingdom Come.  A world of multiple Batmans and increased tech to keep the streets of Gotham safe (also the plan Batman would return to in the sequel to Dark Knight).  In other words, it’s still Batman working his same plan only thinking bigger.

Like with Batman/Bruce Wayne, Batman:  The Return pretty much declares this new vision and direction while at the same time hinting that there will be a shift in tone to the dark, brooding Batman we have come to know over the last few decades.  We see the obligatory check in with the Bat Family, starting with Dick Grayson and Damian Wayne, entrusting them with protecting the streets of Gotham.

“Starting today we fight ideas with better ideas.  The idea of crime with the idea of Batman.” –Batman

In a lot of ways, Batman/Bruce Wayne has shifted into visionary mode, a person with so many ideas that it is difficult to keep up with them.  This in and of itself is a shift from the ultra-focused Batman we’ve come to know.  This Batman is … enthusiastic.  Before, folks were swept up in his mania; now they are carried along by his passion.  And it’s too early to see if this is a brilliant or fatally flawed plan, but Morrison displays a confidence in his handling of the characters as well as the story.  Like Batman/Bruce Wayne, Morrison brings a lot of ideas to the table, not all of them are carried off perfectly, such as his extended metaphor of the wounded bat that opens the book.

David Finch’s art, interpreted by Batt, Winn and Steigerwald, was dark and moody.  His art direction is both eye catching and engaging, creating a motion to the story.

“Mr. Unknown is Dead”

Writer:  Grant Morrison

Artist:  Yanick Paquette

Publisher:  DC Comics

Price:  $3.99

At first blush, my instinct, based on experience with tie-ins to mega events, screamed that if you bought one book, you wouldn’t need the other.  That is far from the case here.  If Batman:  The Return laid out the mission statement, Batman Incorporated is the test run.  And from early on, it’s apparent that there’s a new story telling sheriff in town.

We begin with a journey to Japan and a world of Japanese crime fighters.  A global vision has to have global stories.  However, the new direction wasn’t in the setting, but in the jovial atmosphere of the book.  There is a buoyant humor, not to mention the innuendo laced, Nick & Nora-esque dialogue between Batman and Catwoman.  It seems like Batman isn’t operating from the wounded little boy who lost his parents and whose heart was set on vengeance, but that of a man who had found a measure of healing from that pain.

I was not a fan of the art.  While Yanick Pacquette and Michel Lacombe ably handle both Selina Kyle and Japan, something about it didn’t quite appeal to me that I still can’t quite put my finger on.

“No one can run from death forever.” –Mighty Lord Death Man

We know (and I use the word “we” to refer to those of the comic book intelligentsia familiar with the origins of Batman) that it is the tragic loss of his parents at the hand of a street criminal, and his subsequent thirst for Justice, that drives him into his new life.

Batman has always been a dangerously focused character. The death of his parents at the hands of a criminal gave him a mission in life, but how he went about his mission has led writers to depict him as either a revenge-driven psychopath (continuing to punish the man who killed his parents) or an ardent pursuer of justice (pursuing a higher calling and mission). So this hero’s journey has always been as much internal as it was external.

Similarly, the church already has its mission, the missio Dei, joining in God’s mission to be a blessing to the world. We are called to a mission of reconciliation: one to another and one another to God. God’s reconciling act is centered on the cross, a gift of freedom. The resurrection is a sign that the powers have been defeated, though still active. The cross transforms our condition while also providing an example of hope. A faith with present-future components: the present reality lived in light of a future one. Being united in mission is a sanctifying process. To fight injustice and oppression; ministering to neighbors; not putting up fences or moving away develops disciplines needed for growth. With the help of the Holy Spirit, we practice Pentecost and live out the Gospel. Reconciliation touches the most hidden parts of our souls. God gave reconciliation to us as a ministry that never ends.  One that we need to think locally as well as globally in terms of how we carry it out.

The change in direction heralded by Batman:  the Return and Batman Incorporated is a welcome one, a great start to this series.  Face paced, funny, and filled with a vibrant energy (words I wouldn’t have expected to describe any Batman work these last few years), I hope this direction continues this strong for a long time.