[I originally sent this to them privately, but I wanted to publicly thank them also]

First off, thank you so much for your time, your presence, your generosity, and your awesomeness. You have always been a role-model for me and I wanted to once again say how much I appreciate you. Things couldn’t have gone any better.

Second, the folks you were talking to were a mix of writers, fans, and community organizers. Your words continued to resonate that night. After Afrofuturism Friday, I led another workshop right now called “the Superhero workshop.” Basically me and a lady who was in attendance for your talk, lead a group of women in using story to work through issues of trauma (with the idea that most superheroes origin story are rooted in trauma). Your words kept coming back to her and we all ended up working until midnight exploring your methods of approaching stories by asking questions. And. We. Had. Such. Breakthroughs.

Thirdly, I meet with the founder of the Kheprw Institute every Saturday morning for coffee and our “sacred dialogue” (basically, we’re off the clock and talk about things other than the community organizing work). As a part of the work we’ve been doing, we’ve been dealing with gentrification issues and equity land use. As a part of the worldbuilding for the novel I’m working on, I asked him about what real equity could look like. He went on a rant about how we’ll never achieve equity, not with the systems we have in place, how we can only leaven its worse aspects, and so on. I looked at my elder and told him I was about to put on my Afrofuturist hat: if we were starting a colony on the moon, what could equity look like? He got this look in his eye, I recognize that look of a dreamer, and then he started to give me some scenarios. I say all this to remind us of how Afrofuturism creates a space of us to dream about possibilities. Even visionary leaders sometimes needs that permission to dream, if only to see where we could be.

So thank you again. Know that you have touched a lot of doers and movers in our city.

Peace and love,

Maurice